Year of Grace, Day 3. On Biodiversity and Beautiful Patterns

Today was the second day of the International BION Conference, Biodiversity Today for Tomorrow.  I am so grateful to  be able to attend this conference because places were rather limited. Among the monitoring technologies presented  was identifying bird species through their song patterns. I was truly delighted to learn that birds have dialects, just like whales :-).  Astounding! Even within the same city: the same species of bird living in northern and southern parts of a city will have a distinct variation in their song. I am extremely thankful to be able to hear about these amazing scientific developments from the researchers themselves. The most wonderful aspect of this multi-, inter-, and trans-disciplinary conference is being able to meet people concerned about biodiversity and the environment. I deeply appreciate what they are doing to conserve biodiversity in their particular fields and in different countries. The presence of so many different nationalities and scientific disciplines at this conference also reflects the wonderful cultural and intellectual diversity in our world.  Despite the sobering fact that biodiversity is on the decline, I felt a sense of collective hope and deep dedication towards working to improve our stewardship of this wonderful treasure, the earth.

Patterns of birdsong. Source: R. Bardeli, Fraunhofer Institute of Intelligent Analysis & Information Systems.

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2 thoughts on “Year of Grace, Day 3. On Biodiversity and Beautiful Patterns

  1. The species to the vocalisations on the picture are as follows:
    Upper row:
    Acrocephalus arundinaceus (Great Reed Warbler),
    Troglodytes troglodytes (Wren),
    Fringilla coelebs (Chaffinch),
    Lullula arborea (Wood Lark),
    Parus cearuleus (Blue Tit).

    Lower row:
    Turdus merula (Blackbird),
    Phylloscopus trochilus (Willow Warbler),
    Phylloscopus sibilatrix (Wood Warbler),
    Parus major (Great Tit),
    Ailuroedus buccoides (White-eared Catbird).

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